Taylor Marshall’s ‘Infiltration’: A Review

Recognize and resist. In Dr. Marshall’s ‘Infiltration’ he presents as tentpoles the ‘Permanent Instruction of the Alta Vendita’, the testimony of former communist agent Bella Dodd, and the revelation of the Sankt Gallen Mafia. The book demonstrates, verifiably I might add, that it was the express goal of both the Freemasonic secret societies and the Communist Party to infiltrate and infect the Roman Catholic Church. In the proceeding chapters, Marshall then lays out the symptoms – also verifiable, as Marshall is generous in citing his sources – that the Church may have, in fact, been infiltrated according to the desired ends of the Free Masons and the Communists. He points to high-ranking clerics, including Cardinals, who have been discovered as documented members of the Freemasonic order, and others who espouse positions sympathetic to the pursuits of a Marxist utopia.

The Achilles’ heel of this book is that there is no formal proof throughout much of the work that the symptoms of infiltration, in the liturgy and elsewhere, were in fact due to the successful implementation of the ‘Permanent Instruction’ or the seminary scheme as corroborated by Dodd. What Marshall does, instead, is draw logical conclusions. He points out time and time again that much of what is going on in the Church, and at the highest levels of the hierarchy, would be the logical outcomes of infiltration. He makes a strong case, and it is for this reason that the weakness of his work is hardly a weakness at all. Recorded admissions of guilt might be what’s needed to verify some of Marshall’s conclusions – but those admissions we’ll certainly never get.

The themes of the book appear to converge on the work of the Sankt Gallen Mafia, the Vatileaks scandal, the sudden resignation of Pope Benedict XVI, and the papal election of Bergoglio, now Pope Francis. In an almost poetic fashion, the supposed progression of this infiltration of the Church in recent history is shown to have prepared the soil for the state of the Church today; one wrought with confusion and infighting.

I never got the sense that Marshall was being dishonest or that he was concocting this piecemeal conspiracy theory to increase his own clout as a YouTube personality. In Infiltration, Taylor speaks plainly as a concerned Catholic layman. Even his prescription does not lend itself to sedevacantism or schism, but to prayer and penance. Infiltration is the type of book that you hope is not true, but if you’re honest with yourself, struggle to come up with a more compelling explanation for the state of the Church today.

It was during the fallout of the McCarrick scandal when I, as Marshall would say, “red pilled” to just how diseased the institution is. Even still, I strive to be a faithful son of the Church which is why I agree that we must recognize AND resist.

I’d rate his book 8.5/10.

Exodus

When making any life-altering decisions, we’ve really got to question our motives. If our motivation for change isn’t really worthwhile then we are likely to fall off the wagon sooner rather than later.

Beginning about mid-February I had come upon another weight loss plateau. I didn’t have to look very far to see that this latest pause in progress was self-inflicted. I began to increase my carb intake ever so slightly. Going into this plateau I was about 20 lbs down from my starting weight. Two weeks later? I was still 20 lbs down. I began a struggle with my will power; it seemed as though I had lost my resolve to just stick to the program.

I began to realize that my weight loss “for my family” was a thinly-veiled disguise for my own vain ambitions of getting fit again. I didn’t just want to be healthier, I wanted to look good. I wanted to regain some semblance of self-confidence that I hadn’t felt in years. I’m not here to tell you that these are entirely bad motivations. In fact, they are quite reasonable for any man. Confidence is a good thing.

But I was doing it again; I was falling back into the same old mentality. I was living for myself.

In the latter part of last year, I had stumbled upon a blog post by Taylor Marshall, of the New Saint Thomas Institute, wherein he mentioned all of the benefits that had come from a ninety day program called Exodus 90. I remember thinking to myself, “I want that.”

So I slowly began to research the program and had come to the firm decision that I was to begin on March 1st. Ash Wednesday. This regimen which includes moderate ascetic practices, daily exercises, prayer and reflection, and weekly accountability meetings, was just what I needed. It was almost perfect timing that my decision to begin at the outset of Lent came on the heels of me slipping away from my new low-carb lifestyle.

Exodus 90 for me was not going to focus on how I looked in the mirror; it was going to be about who I am as a Husband, a Father, a Friend, and, most importantly, as a Catholic. Today (March 7th) is Day 7. Our fraternity, which includes me and three other guys, has already had our first meeting and we are off to a great start. The literature that accompanies this 90-day challenge warns us time and time again that while this program starts out “easy” that this Exodus will be anything but easy. I am not only part of a fraternity of four guys, but of a larger community of 1700+ men who have already gone through their own Exodus.

To give you a quick overview as to what my Exodus looks like, here’s a bulleted list of what I am giving up with brief explanations:

  • To combat my love of comfort: Cold/Lukewarm showers only, No snacks between meals, No sweetened beverages, No alcohol, Abstinence & Fasting on Wednesdays and Fridays, No desserts or sweets, regular and intense exercise
  • To combat my addictive tendencies: Computer/Mobile Devices for work/research purposes only (i.e. no social media, etc.), no television (this includes movies and Netflix), Only music that lifts the soul to God, no major material purchases (beyond toiletries)
  • For my wellbeing: Commitment to getting seven hours of sleep each night (harder than you might think), Weekly accountability meetings with your fraternity (small group), Make time for regular holy hour (aka the two hours I spend commuting each day, now without radio)

Why did I list everything?

Not to gloat. Not to prove anything, but to inspire.

Maybe someone will end up reading this who is also in need of a change, just like me. I wanted to disclose the Exodus 90 system in this way to show you that it is no joke, and there will be countless reasons to quit or to not take the challenge at all.

“I just can’t give up social media. I need it for…”

“No hot showers? Are you kidding me?”

“But I’m not even Catholic! So why would I…”

There are endless reasons why someone should NOT do Exodus 90.

I’m doing it for my freedom, because an unhealthy attachment to worldly goods limits my capacity to give of myself and live for others. I’m doing it to get my life back, and to give God control over everything. I’m doing it for happiness and health. I’m doing it for my own salvation.

If these types of improvements don’t sound desirable, then Exodus is not for you.

I do, however, ask that you remember me in your prayers.

Progress Report: As of 3/7/2017, I have lost 24 lbs.